Stephen K. Bannon Sentenced to Four Months in Prison on Two Counts of Contempt of Congress

Stephen K. Bannon Sentenced to Four Months in Prison on Two Counts of Contempt of Congress

Jury Found He Failed to Comply With House Subpoena From Select Committee Investigating Jan. 6 Capitol Breach

            WASHINGTON – Stephen K. Bannon was sentenced today to four months of incarceration and ordered to pay a fine of $6,500 on two counts of contempt of Congress stemming from his failure to comply with a subpoena issued by the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 breach of the United States Capitol.

            Bannon, 68, was found guilty by a jury on July 22, 2022, of one contempt count related to his refusal to appear for a deposition and another count related to his refusal to produce documents in response to a subpoena from the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol. The verdict followed a trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

            On Sept. 23, 2021, the Select Committee issued a subpoena to Bannon. In its subpoena, the Select Committee said it had reason to believe that he had information relevant to understanding events related to Jan. 6, 2021. The subpoena required him to appear and produce documents to the Select Committee on Oct. 7, 2021, and to appear for a deposition before the Select Committee on Oct. 14, 2021. Bannon refused to appear to give testimony as required by subpoena and refused to produce documents in compliance with a subpoena.

            Bannon, formerly a Chief Strategist and Counselor to the President, has been a private citizen since departing the White House in 2017. He was indicted on the contempt charges on Nov. 12, 2021.

            The case was investigated by the FBI’s Washington Field Office. The case is being prosecuted by the Fraud, Public Corruption, and Civil Rights Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia.

Go to Source

If you have specific legal questions in the United States, feel free to look around Legal Help Near Me to see if there are any qualified legal representatives that can help you for free. Legal matters can oftentimes be solved with a simple conversation and a pointed link to the required state solution.